viernes, 30 de octubre de 1587

Edad:
60 años

Relato del día: Parma escribe a la reina Isabel.

THE DUKE OF PARMA to THE QUEEN.

From Andrea de Loo's account, and letters from her ministers, had understood that they might enter into communication with benefit to all Christendom. Had embraced this opportunity with zeal, but notwithstanding many hopes given him of the coming of her commissioners, the matter is still delayed, and he doubts whether she has not changed her mind and had indeed almost resolved to think no more of it, yet as the said Andrea de Loo is now returning thither writes these few lines to assure her that it will not be his fault, if the resolution taken does not go forward.

Your Majesty will make use of this my offer as may seem good to your wisdom, and whatever you shall further give me to understand, I shall ever be ready to serve and honour you with as good heart as I now pray God to preserve your Majesty.Brussels, 9 November, 1587.

Signed, Alo. Farnese. Copy. Endd. by Burghley. Italian. 1 p. [Flanders I. f. 363.]

Fuentes

Calendar of State Papers Foreign: Elizabeth, Volume 21, part 3, April-December 1587.

Holland and Flanders (2).

ed. Sophie Crawford Lomas and Allen B Hinds.

Originally published by His Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1929

 

Noticia: Noticias de Amberes.

ADVERTISEMENTS from ANTWERP.

The Prince of Parma is making great preparations for war, and means to march with all expedition, and as if to a triumph. His own costly apparel "doth exceed for embroidering and is beset with jewels, and the embroiders and diamond cutters work night and day. There are five hundred velvet coats of one sort for lances, and brave new coats for horsemen. Thirty thousand men are ready and gather in Brabant and Flanders ; and in Hennegow and Artois a great number taken up. It is said they shall be in two armies, ten thousand for some great exploit in these parts and twenty thousand to march with the Prince into France. Which way or how soon they shall march is not yet known, but all are ready at an hour's warning. [Provisions, munition, &c., enumerated.]

The new ships from Antwerp cannot be ready before about Lent, but within three or four days there will be thirty sail of ships, to wit cromstevens, hoys and fly-boats, "for there is day and night working upon them." Many mariners are come to this side, and 5000 men move to "Tourhold" [Turnhout] within these two days ; besides all this, a great deal more of preparation which is hard to know. "Whither they are to go is not certain, but some boast shortly to land 20,000 men in 'Walkeren,' by way of Terveere.

Some say, with the shipping of Flanders at Dunkirk and other places to put men into Scotland, for there is store of horses and good friends, and the King's navy of Spain to come at that time into Ireland. Some report to come . . . and upon the sudden to overthrow Barrowe [Bergen-op-Zoom] for they know it is unprovided and the States unwilling to help it and at variance. Others say by two or three ways to enter Tergose. If the Earl of Leicester depart, they doubt not of good proceedings with all expedition.

"The fleet before Lillo ought to be strengthened and licences stayed for a time, until it been seen what effect these matters will take."

Here is certain news that 2500 Germans in France are slain by the Guisarts ; but much heavier news that the King of Navarre's companies, under the son of Cond have slain Duke Joyeuse, with 600 of his best men, and it is hoped that now the Germans can join that King. The Prince of Parma has received a marvellous costly garland for crown from the Pope, and is chosen chief of the Sainte League and now puts in his arms the two cross keys. The King of France hath written for the Prince with expedition, and is said that he marches thither, and by the way will besiege Cammerick [Cambrai]. The Count Mansfeld remains governor till another come, and one of the House of Austridge expected . . . for the Prince will follow his calling for the Sainte League and will not meddle further than in matters of wars.

Andreas de Loo hath been at Cales, bound for England, and by the Prince sent for back in all haste, and now remains at Brussels, attending [i.e. waiting for] the commissioners of England. These proceedings make men marvel, and the Papists rejoice. God for his mercy . . . send his word free passage and preserve her Majesty from treason. Sir William Standly with his companies are come to Turneholt."

9 November, 87, stilo novo, in Antwerp. Endd. "Occurents [sent] from the Lord Governor of Vlushing" ; and by Burghley "6 Nov. 1587. By Mr. Byngham." 2 pp. [Newsletters XLV. f. 10.]

Fuentes

Calendar of State Papers Foreign: Elizabeth, Volume 21, part 3, April-December 1587.

Holland and Flanders (2).

ed. Sophie Crawford Lomas and Allen B Hinds.

Originally published by His Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1929

 

Día siguiente